Scanner Pro: My Favorite Archival Resource

Scanner Pro: My Favorite Archival Resource

I am a huge fan of Scanner Pro, which I use to capture documents while I am working in archives. Scanner Pro is an application from Readdle and is available for the iOS platform.  It works on my iPhone, but I mainly use it on my iPad Mini. The app uses the device’s built-in camera to scan documents ranging in size from receipts to newspaper pages.Scanner Pro

Documents can be scanned individually or in batches.  After taking the initial image, Scanner Pro suggests image borders, which the user can adjust.  Next, the user can define the image size (A4, Letter, Legal, Tabloid and more) and type (color photo, black and white text, or grayscale).

Images are saved on the device and can be uploaded as JPGs or PDFs to Dropbox, Evernote,  emailed, or printed.

Scanner Pro is also ideal for documenting the bulky scrapbooks in our council collection. For example, we have a delightful scrapbook assembled by Mrs. Pansy Gregg when her Senior Girl Scout troop toured Europe in 1964. She preserved photos and dozens of souvenirs, especially of daily life aboard the H.M.S. Queen Mary, the ocean liner that carried the troop across the Atlantic.

The app makes it easy to capture the full two-page spreads in her scrapbook.

The inside front cover of Pansy Gregg's  scrapbook.

The inside front cover of Pansy Gregg’s scrapbook. I enlarged this to poster-size and have it hanging in my office.

 

An elegant luncheon served aboard the Queen Mary on July 30, 1964

An elegant luncheon served aboard the Queen Mary on July 30, 1964

Senior Troop 1027 boards the Queen Mary en route to Pax Lodge and Our Chalet.

Senior Troop 1027 boards the Queen Mary en route to Pax Lodge and Our Chalet.

 

For screenshots of the app in action, see AppStorm’s review of Scanner Pro.

Apple Computer named Scanner Pro one of its Amazing Productivity Apps of 2014, and slashed the price from $6.99 to $2.99.

Who’s That Girl Scout? Leah Burket

Seventy-five years ago, in June 1939, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth visited Washington, DC.  Girl Scout Leah Burket was selected to present the Queen with a bouquet of flowers as the royal couple left the White House en route to a garden party at the British Embassy.  Her Majesty was enchanted by Leah and paused the procession for a closer look at one of Leah’s badges.

Girl Scout Leah Burkett, left, tells Queen Elizabeth about one of her awards.

Girl Scout Leah Burkett, left, tells Queen Elizabeth about one of her awards.

Today, June 8, 2014, Washington Post columnist John Kelly recalled “Their majesties’ magical tour of Washington 75 years ago.” He included a version of this photo, but the print version cropped out poor Leah. That is a shame, as she was an outstanding  Girl Scout.

Queen Elizabeth asked Leah about her Book Finder badge.

Queen Elizabeth asked Leah about her Book Finder badge.

Leah was a member of Takoma Park, Maryland, Troop 51.  She was in the same troop as Jean Boyer Porter, who remained an active Girl Scout in the Washington area until her death last year.  Jean’s children generously donated her Girl Scout memorabilia to the Nation’s Capital Council, including scrapbooks and photo albums full of Troop 51’s exploits in the late 1930s and early 1940s.

Girl Scout troops were to assemble at 3:45 on June 8, 1939, for the royal visit.

Girl Scout troops were to assemble at 3:45 on June 8, 1939, for the royal visit.

Leah, 15, became quite the celebrity.  She told the Evening Star newspaper that after she presented Queen Elizabeth with a bouquet of forget-me-nots, sweet peas, and lilies of the valley, the royal asked to shake her hand.

“Then she asked how many badges I had, and I said there were 15 on this uniform. She asked about one in particular. That is the book-finder badge. She told me that her daughter Elizabeth [now Queen Elizabeth II] is working for her badges.”

The photo of Leah and the royals was reproduced around the world. She recalled getting letters containing the clipping from people across the United States, as well as from Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, and India.  She became pen pals with several of them and learned about the hardships many people faced in war-torn Britain.

Leah put her Girl Scout leadership skills to work to organize a “Bundles for Britain” dance at Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring, Maryland.  Bundles for Britain sent packages of warm clothing, first aid kits, and other items to British families. Inspired by Leah, the Silver Spring Young Men’s Democratic Club and the Indian Springs Country Club also held similar dances.

Three cheers for Leah Burket!

 

Françoise May, the Belgian Apple Blossom Queen

Today, May 2, the Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival will crown its 2014 queen in Winchester, VA.  In 1933 that honor went to a 23-year old Girl Scout leader, Françoise May.

Françoise May, the 10th Apple Blossom Queen, sits upon her throne.

Françoise May, the 10th Apple Blossom Queen, sits upon her throne.

Françoise was the eldest daughter of Paul May, the Belgian ambassador to the United States. She had been an active Girl Guide in Belgium, and when her father was posted to the United States in 1931, she immediately signed up with the Washington, DC, area Girl Scouts. She became captain (leader) of Troop 53, and the troop grew so large that it divided into 53 and 53A. Françoise became a popular speaker about the Girl Guides and a staff member for Camp May Flather. She was awarded the Thanks Badge for her efforts.

 

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Her younger sisters, Ghislane and Elisabeth, also joined Troop 53.

Françoise presents the First Class rank to her sister Ghislane and other members of Troop 53.

Françoise presents the First Class rank to her sister Ghislane and other members of Troop 53.

The entire troop traveled to Winchester for the coronation ceremony.

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Troop member Virginia Hammerley, who later joined the staff of the Girl Scouts of Washington, DC, kept detailed scrapbooks of Troop 53’s activities, including many clippings and items from the coronation of Queen Françoise. Her scrapbooks are in the archives of the Girl Scout Council of the Nation’s Capital.

Ambassador May died suddenly in July 1934. When Françoise, her sisters, and their mother returned to Belgium, “Ginger” Hammerley succeeded her as troop captain.

Excerpt from farewell letter to Troop 53.

Excerpt from farewell letter to Troop 53.

Her touching farewell letter to the troop may be downloaded in its entirety by clicking here.

 

Françoise pauses for a photo while working at Camp May Flather.

Françoise pauses for a photo while working at Camp May Flather.

Preserving Our Story in Our Own Ways

The Second Annual “Girl Scout Antiques Road Show” took place on Saturday, April 5, alongside the Nation’s Capital Annual Meeting.

Following the theme of “Preserving Our Story,” members of the GSCNC Archives and History Committee brought scrapbooks, quilts, and other unofficial items created to preserve their unique Girl Scout experiences.  Delegates and guests were encouraged to bring their own Girl Scout memorabilia to share.

Committee member Julie Lineberry (second from right) identifies an old Girl Scout publication.

Committee member Julie Lineberry (second from right) identifies an old Girl Scout publication.

 

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https://www.dropbox.com/sc/isifmam9eadwwll/apKiuOz10G

The authentic Girl Scout bugle was a big hit.

Denise Tomlin explains her bugle technique.

Denise Tomlin explains her bugle technique.

We also enlarged selected photos from the many scrapbooks in our collection that are too fragile too display.

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If you didn’t make it to the Archives exhibit at the Annual Meeting, you can still see many of these items on display at the Council office at 4301 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC.

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We hope to see you in 2015!