Preserving Our Story in Our Own Ways

The Second Annual “Girl Scout Antiques Road Show” took place on Saturday, April 5, alongside the Nation’s Capital Annual Meeting.

Following the theme of “Preserving Our Story,” members of the GSCNC Archives and History Committee brought scrapbooks, quilts, and other unofficial items created to preserve their unique Girl Scout experiences.  Delegates and guests were encouraged to bring their own Girl Scout memorabilia to share.

Committee member Julie Lineberry (second from right) identifies an old Girl Scout publication.

Committee member Julie Lineberry (second from right) identifies an old Girl Scout publication.

 

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The authentic Girl Scout bugle was a big hit.

Denise Tomlin explains her bugle technique.

Denise Tomlin explains her bugle technique.

We also enlarged selected photos from the many scrapbooks in our collection that are too fragile too display.

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If you didn’t make it to the Archives exhibit at the Annual Meeting, you can still see many of these items on display at the Council office at 4301 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC.

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We hope to see you in 2015!

Snowed in at Camp Potomac Woods

Who remembers the Girl Scout troop that became snowbound at Camp Potomac Woods?

Helicopter from Fort Belvoir airlifts Troop 163 from Camp Potomac Woods in 1958.

Helicopter from Fort Belvoir airlifts Arlington Troop 163 from Camp Potomac Woods in 1958.

Washington Post, February 17, 1958

Washington Post, February 17, 1958

To the Girl and Boy, Scouting IS Camping

Summer resident camp registration began last week at Nation’s Capital, as thousands of parents signed in to the online system.  Hundreds of girls will make their first pilgrimage to Camp May Flather, Potomac Woods, Winona, and Coles Trip this summer,  following in the footsteps of their sisters, mothers, and grandmothers.

Recently I found a wonderful GSUSA statement on the value of camping tucked away in one of our Rockwood history boxes and this seems a good time to share it:

Camping, the chance to live away from home, in the out-of-doors, with its offer of primitive life and woodland adventure, is part of the dream of every girl who becomes a Girl Scout … the tent, the campfire and all those things connected with the romantic adventure of simple living in the out-of-doors, continue to lure American children ‘to the camps of known desire and proven delight.’

Scouting’s great appeal to girls and boys — and leaders too — is in its promise of outdoor adventure. It is this assurance that those who ‘come along with us’ will have many opportunities for camping and hiking that has attracted and will continue to attract young people to Scouting. None of the other interesting and worthwhile things that Scouts may do have this paramount importance of camping. To the girl and boy, Scouting IS camping.

This has been true since the beginning of the movement. In his earliest writings, Baden-Powell made it very clear that one of Scouting’s important aims was to give young people abundant opportunities to go camping. He saw the camp situation as the troop leaders’ greatest opportunity to train young people in Scouting.

… The camp experience should not be something separate and apart from the troop’s other activities. Rather, it should be a continuation, and perhaps the most important part, of the troop’s year-round program. The troops that are able to progress through camping experiences of increasing interest and difficulty, last longer and do the most effective work. It is the camping troop that girls flock to join.

The statement comes from Guideline 5B of the 1959 GSUSA Council Administrative Series, authored by Julian Harris Salomon.  Trained as a landscape architect, Mr. Salomon designed the grounds and camp sites at Rockwood, the Macy Center, even Camp David. He worked for the National Park Service and later was property manager for GSUSA.  Mr. Salomon testified in the dispute over the proposed sale of Rockwood in 1981 (and I hope to get a copy of his deposition one day). His efforts to preserve Rockwood for future Girl Scouts were recognized by naming one of the Manor House rooms in his honor in 1987.