About

How does a political scientist wind up as a Girl Scout historian? It is not as big a leap as you might think. Political science deals with the balance of power, center-periphery relations, identity, ideology, and symbolism, which can be useful tools for studying any social group, like Girl Scouts.

While I use this background and perspective to think about Girl Scout issues, some days I just want to focus on classic uniforms, beautifully designed badges, and the latest cookie flavors. I promise to avoid jargon and professor-speak–Scout’s honor.

Instead, I hope readers come away understanding that there is so much more to Girl Scouting than just cookies. I want girls to realize to discover the world of Girl Scouting beyond their troops. There are millions of women who have worn similar uniforms and sung the same songs and made the same promise for over 100 years, and I hope today’s Girl Scouts get a feeling of that sisterhood that they are now a part of.

As chair of the Archives and History Committee of the Girl Scout Council of the Nation’s Capital, I am looking for new ways to share our collection with as many people as possible.  I invite you to visit our history program centers in Frederick, Maryland, and Winchester, Virginia. Then join us here as we take our collection into cyberspace.

 

robertsonann_capital

Receiving the GSCNC Capital Award from Council President Diane Tipton (l), April 2014. The award recognized my book, Girl Scout Council of the Nation’s Capital.

I am a freelance writer and editor and long-time Girl Scout, and I am thrilled at the opportunity to combine these interests.  Please contact me at ann@robertsonwriting.com.

 

—Ann Robertson

The opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of the Girl Scout Council of the Nation’s Capital, its professional staff, or the other volunteers on the GSCNC Archives and History Committee.

11 thoughts on “About

  1. So glad I stumbled across your site, Ann. (found it while reading my EFA member email list). I live in CA but do occasionally make it back to DC, so next time we come I will make it a priority to visit the GSCNC archives. I like GS history too, and have written a couple of times on my editing blog, as well as on my personal blog, about what I am learning now that my daughter is in scouts. So if you ever need a what’s-going-on-today perspective for context, let me know!

  2. WOW! I love this! I’m getting such wonderful bits of history that I never knew, like GS being accused of promoting Communism?! Sounds like some thought GS was not conservative enough. I had the opposite problem in the 60’s; GS was TOO conservative. They were “part of the Establishment” or (worse yet) they were “Square”. How things change. Yet Scouting just keeps rolling along.

  3. I am so thrilled that I stumbled across your blog. I found myself just sucked right in! Fascinating – all of it! Thank you for your dedication to preserving the wonderful history of the Girl Scouts in our area. I am particularly intrigued by how your Troop of Seniors and Ambassadors have also embraced this history – clearly a credit to your enthusiasm as well! I was never a girl scout as a girl – I can never forget going to the organizational meeting at my school so excited about becoming a Brownie and then feeling the disappointment of no adult stepping up to be the leader. Fast forward – when my daughter was in Kindergarten and another Mom called me on the phone and “invited” me to be a leader with her and “ride her coat tails” I remembered my experience as a child and of course, said yes. 15 years later, my Gold Award Girl Scout daughter is a rising Junior in college and I still have a troop of Seniors and Ambassadors about to travel to Iceland and PAX Lodge. I, too, feel a connection to the history – not really sure why other than the respect owed to something that endures for over 100 years and still remains vibrant today. Thank you for preserving the past!

  4. Hi Ann! This is a great project. I feel like I met you at some Girl Scout event. Maybe in Savannah? I’m a great-niece of Juliette Gordon Low. All the best.

    • Hi Margaret, thank you so much for your comment!! I’m not sure if we’ve met. I actually will be in Savannah next weekend. My daughter is at SCAD and will be living in the dorm nearest to the birthplace.

  5. Hi Ann, I just found your site. My mother, Jeanne DePartee Shallow founded Troop 1, Kabul, Afghanistan in 1956. We made our own embroidered scarves with the Afghan and US flags crossed behind the GS logo. I still have my scarf and merit badges on the sash we had made by a tailor there. Our small troop had girls from eleven different countries, mostly from other diplomatic families. I have wondered if pictures of our troop and campouts in Sheik’s compounds would find a home somewhere. This could be so important now with the situation in the Middle East. We also had a troop in Tehran, Iran, our next post, from 1959-1961. Suzen

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